If you are reading this you probably just finished filling out or are in the process of filling out Form I-130 for one of your family members. Whatever the situation may be, this article is for you. Whether you are a U.S. citizen or a permanent resident, you must file the petition (Form I-130) as a first step to sponsor your relative for a green card. Therefore the document requirements are the same for a U.S. citizen sponsor or a permanent resident sponsor.

The filing of Form I-130 is one of the most important stages in proving to the USCIS that your relative is qualified to immigrate to the U.S. The Form provides a basis to establish the sponsor’s citizenship or permanent resident status and to prove the relationship between the sponsor and the beneficiary.

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The following documents must accompany the immediate relative or family preference petition (Form I-130) to show that the petitioner is eligible to act as a sponsor and has a qualifying relationship with the beneficiary.

a. Proof of the Petitioner’s citizenship or permanent resident status which can be established by:

i) For evidence of U.S. citizenship.

• A birth certificate showing that you were born in the U.S., or
• An unexpired U.S. passport issued to you as a U.S. citizen, or
• A copy of your naturalization certificate or certificate of citizenship, or
• A copy of Form FS-240, Consular Report of Birth Abroad (CRBA) issued by a U.S. Embassy or a Consulate.

ii) For evidence of lawful permanent residence.

• A copy of your permanent resident card (Form I-551), or
• A proof of admission as a permanent resident on your passport.

If you are unable to establish one of the above documents, you may present a notarized affidavit that explains the reason for your inability. In such a situation, the affidavit may be used in addition to one of the following secondary evidence :
• A baptismal certificate, or
• Census records, or
• A birth certificate from a local or military hospital.
• A temporary evidence of lawful permanent residence, ex. I-551 stamp.

b. Proof of the relationship between the petitioner and the beneficiary:

i) Petition filed by a spouse.

• The marriage certificate, or
• In absence of a certificate, proof of customary marriage and that the marriage is recognized under the local jurisdiction.

ii) Petition filed by a mother on behalf of a child (includes adult or married) or by the child on behalf of her mother.

• The birth certificate of the child showing the name of the mother, and
• The marriage certificate of the mother if her current name is different than that of the one listed on the child’s birth certificate, and
• The marriage certificate of the daughter if her current name is different than the one listed on her birth certificate.

iii) Petition filed by a father on behalf of a child (includes adult or married) or by the child on behalf of the father (marital child).

• The birth certificate of the child showing both the parent’s name, the marriage certificate of the parents, and
• The marriage certificate of a daughter if her name changed after marriage.

iv) Petition filed by a father on behalf of a child (includes adult or married) or by the child on behalf of the father (non-marital child).

• The child’s birth certificate showing the father’s name,
• The daughter’s marriage certificate if her name changed after marriage, and existence of a bona fide familial relationship before the child was married or reached the age of 21.

v) Petition filed by the sponsor on behalf of their brother or sister who has the same mother.

• The sponsor’s birth certificate and the beneficiary sibling’s birth certificate that shows the same mother, and
• The marriage certificate of a sister if her name changed after marriage.

vi) Petition filed by the sponsor on behalf of their brother or sister who has the same father.

• The sponsor’s birth certificate and the beneficiary sibling’s birth certificate that shows the same father, and
• The marriage certificate of the father to each mother, and
• The marriage certificate of a sister if her name changed after marriage.

c. Immigration Attorney in Oklahoma City:

The I-130 petition is a very important document based on which the USICS determines the eligibility of your relative to pursue family-based immigration and your eligibility to sponsor the family member. You must fill the Form I-130 accurately, free of errors, and submit all required documents. Attorney Vivid Niroula can help you complete your petition and ensure correct and prompt filing.

Our practice includes marriage-based green cards, family-based immigration, employment-based immigration, PERM, EB-1, EB-2, EB-3 green cards, and other immigration matters. We respond quickly and our rates are affordable.

Call the law office of Vivid Niroula today at (405) 456-9250 or contact us through our website.