In Oklahoma, a property owner or a manager must give the required notice to the Tenant before you can initiate the eviction proceeding. Depending on the type of the rental agreement, or the reasons for the lease termination the type of notice required may vary. However, there are a few circumstances, where Oklahoma law allows a Landlord to initiate a forcible entry and detainer action, also called an eviction lawsuit, without having to serve a written notice on the Tenant or occupant.

Under the Residential Landlord and Tenant Act, a Landlord may sue to evict a Tenant or an occupant from the property without having to serve a written notice to the Tenant in the following situations: (1) expiration of the lease terms, (2) noncompliance that threatens imminent harm to a person or the premises, (3) criminal activity, and (4) drug-related criminal activity.

(1) Expiration of the lease terms: A lease agreement for a definite time or a lease that is set to expire on some date in the future is naturally terminated without notice when the time period is over, or when the expiration date is reached. If the Tenant continues living on the property or otherwise occupying the property, then he or she turns into something called a holdover Tenant. If the holdover tenant continues to occupy the property with your permission, then obviously there is no issue. However, if the holdover tenant is in continued occupancy of the property after the expiration of the lease and without your permission, then you may immediately bring an action for possession and damages. In such a situation, Oklahoma law does not require a Landlord to serve any type of notice on the Tenant or occupant. For example, if a Tenant refuses to leave after his lease for 12 months expires, and continues living in the property without your permission, you may immediately bring an eviction by filing a forcible entry and detainer petition with the court – no written notice is required under such circumstances.

(2) Noncompliance that threatens imminent harm to a person or the premises: If the Tenant breaches a lease term, such that the noncompliance threatens to cause imminent and irremediable harm to a person or the premises, the Landlord may immediately bring an eviction action if the Tenant does not remedy such noncompliance after he has notice of it. For example, if a Tenant keeps an exotic pet in violation of the lease terms, despite several warnings fails to remedy such violation where the pet may cause a severe injury or death if escaped, you may immediately file an eviction action – no written notice is required under such circumstances.

(3) Criminal activity: Any criminal activity on the premise that threatens the health, safety, or right of peaceful enjoyment of the property by other tenants, that is committed by the Tenant or his guest will be grounds for immediate termination of the lease. For example, if a Tenant has violent outbursts where he threatens or physically injures another tenant, such acts will most likely terminate the lease, and the Landlord may immediately file for an eviction action – no written notice is required under such circumstances.

(4) Drug-related criminal activity: Any drug-related activity on or near the premises of the property by the Tenant or his guest will be grounds for immediate termination of the lease. For example, if the Tenant is selling illegal drugs at the house or near the premises, such acts will most likely terminate the lease, and the Landlord may immediately file for an eviction action – no written notice is required under such circumstances.

OKC Eviction Lawyer serving all Oklahoma Landlords

If you are an Oklahoma Landlord who needs help with the eviction process, please contact Niroula Law by calling (405) 456-9250, or by filling out the Contact Us Form. We are experienced in all types of eviction proceedings and have a solid understanding of Oklahoma Landlord-Tenant Laws.